Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4782
Title: Dataset for: Gaze behavior is associated with the cortisol response to acute psychosocial stress in the virtual TSST
Authors: Vatheuer, C. Carolyn
Vehlen, Antonia
von Dawans, Bernadette
Domes, Gregor
Issue Date: 24-Apr-2021
Publisher: PsychArchives
Abstract: Dataset for: C. Carolyn Vatheuer, Antonia Vehlen, Bernadette von Dawans, Gregor Domes (2021). Gaze behavior is associated with the cortisol response to acute psychosocial stress in the virtual TSST. In: Journal of Neural Transmission, Special Issue: World Association for Stress Related and Anxiety Disorders (WASAD). Background. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is a reliable tool for psychobiological stress induction. Because of its socio-evaluative nature, it has been useful for investigating gaze behavior. It has been shown that healthy people avoid looking toward faces when under stress, a finding that corroborates studies demonstrating avoidance of eye contact in social anxiety disorder. Yet, little is known about the relationship between gaze behavior and the biological stress response. Methods. In a final sample of 74 healthy males, a virtual reality version of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST-VR) with an integrated eye tracker was implemented to investigate gaze behavior during acute stress induction. Stress response measures were collected via saliva samples and subjective stress ratings. Additional questionnaires were administered for examining the influence of social anxiety traits. Results. The TSST-VR elicited a significant psychobiological stress response. Overall, higher gaze times on judges compared to surroundings were found in the speech task while this pattern was reversed in the arithmetic task. Critically, there was a significant negative association between gaze time on judges and cortisol output in cortisol responders. Conclusions. In a non-clinical sample, avoidance of gaze is associated with a stronger cortisol response to acute stress. This study demonstrates the potential of eye tracking to disentangle the effects of acute stress on social interaction, warranting further investigation in clinical populations characterized by high levels of anxiety in social situations, such as social anxiety and autism spectrum disorder.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/4221
http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4782
Citation: Vatheuer, C. C., Vehlen, A., Von Dawans, B., & Domes, G. (2021). Dataset for: Gaze behavior is associated with the cortisol response to acute psychosocial stress in the virtual TSST [Data set]. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.4782
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